Deborah Byrne - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Verani Realty Somerville
Accolades include: Government Certified, Performance Certified,Top 4% Sales Nationwide, Chairmans Circle, Presidents Circle, Relocation Director, Notary Public, Realtor®, CRS, CBR, CDPE, LMC, Energy Star Certification, Foreclosures MASS Certification, AHWD, CSP, SRES and RECS Top Producer in Massachusetts Awards
617-201-4730 | dbyrne2510@yahoo.com


Posted by Deborah Byrne on 9/24/2018

While it's not always possible for conditions to be "perfect" when a real estate agent is showing a home for sale, things usually go more smoothly when homeowners are not present.

There are several reasons for this, including the fact that the family's presence at a real estate showing may make the prospect feel self conscious and uncomfortable.

Among other things, the potential buyer may feel like they're intruding and being an imposition. Some buyers also find it harder to concentrate on the many details they need to focus on to evaluate the home.

The ideal scenario happens when house hunters are able to picture themselves as the future owners of your home -- perhaps imagining what it would feel like to cook dinner in your kitchen, entertain guests in your living room, and relax on the back porch. However, when you and your family are there, it makes it more difficult for them to conjure up those images in their mind. So, to the extent that it's possible, it's often a good idea to take the kids out for ice cream or go on a short trip to the mall when a showing of your home is scheduled.

Granted, it may be a little inconvenient -- especially if the visit was set up at the last minute -- but you don't want to unintentionally dissuade someone from making an offer on your house. You never know what might "upset the apple cart!" There's a lot at stake and every prospect is a potential buyer.

Ideally, prospects should feel unpressured, unhurried, and free to express their opinions about what they're seeing. If they feel like they have to weigh their words carefully and be discreet about every reaction, then their discomfort may spill over into their feelings about the house, itself. Since buying a home is often an emotional decision, any negative feelings in the prospect could potentially derail the chances of a purchase offer being made.

Real estate agents not only serve as knowledgeable "tour guides" and objective sources of information for house hunters, but they're also there to accentuate the positive and minimize the negative aspects of a property. One of their main objectives is to put prospects at ease and help them appreciate all the desirable aspects of your home.

There are dozens of details, property features, unique attributes, and flaws that potential buyers are trying to assimilate and remember, so the fewer distractions there are, the better! That's why it makes sense to keep the atmosphere as uncomplicated as possible. It can be a bit of a delicate balance for real estate agents to maintain, but most have the training, experience, and finesse to keep things on an even keel and moving forward!





Posted by Deborah Byrne on 9/17/2018

In some instances, a home seller has limited time and resources to list his or her house and promote it to prospective buyers. Fortunately, there are many ways for a seller to make the most of his or her time and resources throughout the property selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a house seller get the most out of his or her time and resources.

1. Create a Plan

A home selling strategy can make a world of difference for any seller, at any time. Because if a seller knows what to expect after he or she lists a residence, this individual can plan accordingly.

As you put together a home selling strategy, think about your property selling goals. Then, you can determine the steps you'll need to take to achieve these goals Ė something that may help you streamline the house selling journey.

2. Learn About Your Target Audience

Consider the buyer's perspective Ė you'll be glad you did. If you understand why buyers may consider your residence, you can ensure your home listing hits the mark with them. And as a result, you could boost your chances of enjoying a fast, profitable home selling experience.

Don't forget to analyze your home's strengths and weaknesses too. Oftentimes, it is beneficial for a seller to conduct a house inspection before he or she lists a residence. With an inspection report in hand, a seller can identify any underlying home problems and correct these issues before they can slow down a potential home sale.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

If you need help to sell your home, you can always hire a real estate agent. There are many qualified real estate agents available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals will do everything possible to ensure you can optimize your time and resources throughout the house selling journey.

A real estate agent understands the home selling journey varies from person to person. As such, he or she first will meet with you and find out why you are selling your residence. Next, a real estate agent will provide a personalized home selling strategy. A real estate agent then will promote your residence to prospective buyers, host home showings and open house events and much more.

Of course, if you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent is ready to help you determine the best course of action as well. Performing an in-depth analysis of a homebuying proposal sometimes can be difficult, but a real estate agent is happy to help you make an informed home selling decision.

For those who are looking to achieve the best-possible results during the property selling journey, it generally is beneficial to explore ways to maximize your time and resources. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you'll be better equipped than ever before to use your time and resources to enjoy a quick, successful home selling experience.




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Posted by Deborah Byrne on 9/10/2018

No income verification mortgage loans sound like a great idea. Also known as stated loans, these are easier to obtain than traditional mortgages. You wonít have to go through endless amounts of paperwork that traditional mortgages require. Think again. These types of loans are high risk and borrowers may have a hard time paying these loans back. Many lenders have removed these kinds of loans from their list of options. In certain circumstances, these loans can work for you, but you have to do your homework. 


Where Can You Get A Stated Loan?


Some lenders still provide these stated loans with no verification process required. Unlike earlier times, these loans are now pretty difficult to obtain. Typically, this type of mortgage is geared towards the self-employed and requires a large down payment. Also, the borrower must have a very good credit score to be considered for the loan. 


Are Stated Loans Unaffordable?


Since these loans come at very high interest rates, they are often seen as unaffordable due to the high monthly payment. Stated loans can have double the interest rate of what the current available mortgage rates are. However, if you donít have many options, or are in a hurry to get a home and have money in the bank, it could work well for you.  


Could A No Income Verification Loan Be Right For You? 


If you really want a home loan, the first step is to be truly honest about your income. If you find a beautiful home and know that itís out of your price range, you could risk defaulting on the loan. 


To truly understand what you can afford, youíll need to figure out all of your monthly expenses including taxes, mortgage insurance, phone bills and grocery bills. This will give you a full picture of your finances. Once you look at all of these factors, you may find that it does make the most sense for you to get a no income verification loan. 


Deciding On The Type Of Loan Youíll Get


If you find that you need a lower monthly payment, it may make more sense for you to go after a traditional home loan. If youíre self-employed and know that your options are limited, a stated loan certainly is an option for you, youíll just need to understand the risks of the entire process. Youíll also need to have a bunch of documents ready for the lender once you decide to go for the home loan. You can compare the costs of a no income verification loan to a traditional mortgage. Then, you can ask your lender what theyíll need from you in order to verify everything for the traditional mortgage. Any good broker can help you through your decision-making process. Youíll want to be well informed and compare all of the programs along with their fees. You should get recommendations on a lender who has the knowledge and experience to help you find the home loan thatís right for you.




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Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Deborah Byrne on 9/3/2018

When you budget to buy a home, you sit down, do the math, and try to estimate what all of your monthly costs will be. There are so many monthly costs that come with being a homeowner that can make the whole process complicated. Sure, you have taken the standard costs into account like home insurance, property taxes, and even utilities. But there are a few out-of-the-box costs that youíll need to consider for your house hunt.


Flood Or Other Natural Disaster Insurance


Natural disasters are costly and devastating. Many homeowners who live in areas that are affected by natural disasters like floods and earthquakes often opt for additional coverage for their homes. Premiums for earthquake and flood insurance often end up being very high. As a natural disaster strikes, these premiums can go up even more. If you live in one of the high-risk areas for natural disasters, youíll want to check with your insurance agent ahead of time to plan for the additional costs that these special kinds of insurance will incur.


Water Costs During A Drought


There are many areas across the US that suffer drought conditions from time to time. Your water bill can skyrocket during these times. Itís best to continue conserving water and watch your bill closely in order to try and save some costs. Thereís not a whole lot you can do otherwise to control your bill. Youíll need to stay prepared with some extra cash on hand in case of these emergencies and know that costs can rise due to different environmental conditions.  


Tax Hikes And Special Assessments 


As a homeowner, youíll need to prepare for different kinds of assessments and tax increases. If your condominium complex needs significant repairs then youíll probably end up paying an assessment to help offset the costs. This is what comes with belonging to a homeownerís association. 


You canít prevent that the town is building a brand new school that requires a tax increase, nor can you prevent roof damage on one of the buildings in your complex. Financially, this is a hidden cost of homeownership that you should be prepared for. 


Unexpected Maintenance Costs And Home Furnishings


Once you move into a home, youíll need to prepare for the unexpected. The dishwasher may need to be replaced. The roof may need repair. The walls may need some paint. 


When you buy a home you may also need a bunch of things to furnish the home. These could include dishes, pots and pans, sofas, beds, and more. You donít want to leave your new home completely empty! You also donít want to be without vital appliances like an oven or a sink for too long if they are outdated or in disrepair. This is why itís a good idea to have extra money on hand to deal with any of these costs.


The best rule of thumb to follow when buying a home is to always be prepared with a but of extra cash on hand to avoid major issues down the road.           






Posted by Deborah Byrne on 8/27/2018

Have you ever visited someone's home and thought to yourself, "Their living room seems really cluttered" or "Those counter tops look like they haven't been updated since the 1960s!"

Many people quickly notice decorating flaws or home maintenance issues in other people's houses, but when it comes to their own homes -- well, that's another story!

Why is that the case? Two reasons: You're emotionally attached to your own home environment and you're also "too close to the trees to see the forest." It's hard to step back and see your home through a fresh set of eyes -- which is exactly the way prospective buyers are going to look it.

Curb appeal -- or a lack, thereof-- will be the first thing they notice, followed by positive or negative first impressions of your home's interior -- if they get that far! So if you're preparing to put your home on the market, you don't want to be like the person who tries to represent themselves in court. As Abraham Lincoln once said, they have "a fool for a client!"

Since first impressions are so vital when selling your house, it makes sense to confer with someone who really knows the ropes when it comes to home staging. Typically, that would be one of the following professionals:

  • An experienced real estate agent: Real estate agents are in the business of helping people sell their homes as quickly and profitably as possible -- it's a win/win situation. In all likelihood, they've conducted hundreds of house tours and listened to a massive amount of feedback from prospective buyers. One thing they've invariably noticed is that a lot of people react the same way to the same issues. Based on experience and a trained eye, most real estate agents can quickly spot and point out cost-effective ways to make your home more marketable and visually appealing.
  • A professional home stager: Although not all communities have access to professional home stagers, there are talented and knowledgeable experts in that field who can offer valuable advice. If you're working with an experienced real estate agent, however, it probably would not be necessary to pay extra to hire a professional staging consultant.

According to the National Association of Realtors, the median amount of money spent on staging a home is $675, so it doesn't necessarily have to be ultra-expensive. In a survey of its membership, Realtors ranked living rooms and kitchens as the most important rooms to stage. Also considered important are the master bedroom, dining room, and bathrooms.

Thirty seven percent of Realtorsģ representing sellers believe that buyers most often offer a 1 to 5 percent increase on the value of a staged home. A smaller percentage say the potential increase is in the neighborhood of 6% to 10%. However you look at it, you're tipping the scales in your direction when you make your home look its best prior to putting it up for sale.







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